101 DIY Guide

Do It Yourself Guide

Working Your Soil So You Can Grow Healthy Plants

You may find organic gardening to either be a source of great relaxation, or a frustratingly difficult enterprise. These tips should help you to become a better organic gardener.

Pay attention to how you lay sod. Before the sod can be laid, you should prepare the soil. Pull out any weeds and break up the soil. Make sure your soil is flat and compacted. Be sure the soil is thoroughly moist. Stagger your sod so that each joint offsets from joints in adjacent rows. Firm the sod down to form a flat, even surface, and fill in any gaps between the sod with a little soil. After two weeks of daily watering, the sod should be rooted; at this time, it is now safe to walk on it.

Clay Soil

Clay soil can be very hard to work with, and you will often find that it sticks to the shovel. Use a thin coat of floor or car wax on your shovel, then buff it with a nice clean cloth to make dealing with clay soil easier. The clay easily slides off the surface while keeping the end from getting rusty.

Keeping your garden soil rich and healthy is the best way to discourage garden pests. Healthy and well-nourished plants will be hardier and therefore better able to prevent pests from taking hold. So give your garden a kick start by beginning with a healthy batch of natural and organic soil.

Climbing plants and vines are great for covering fences and wall structures. They can be used to cover up unsightly fences or walls. Often, they can grow enough to cover up an eyesore in one season. No need to worry if a bush or tree is in the way, as climbers can grow through them. Also, they can match the shape of an arbor. Some require ties attaching them to supports, but others will attach themselves to any surface nearby. If you’re looking for the most reliable varieties available, choose from clematis, wisteria, and climbing roses.

Stink Bugs

Stink bugs can damage your garden, especially if you garden in the fall. Stink bugs are attracted to tomatoes, beans and most fruits. If they are left in the garden, they can do great damage to your plants, so you should do whatever you can to eliminate them.

Pre-soak your seeds through the night in a dark area. Soak the seeds by placing them in a container where they are covered with water. This lets water soak into the seeds, giving them an extra boost of hydration when they start growing. This will also give your seeds a much better chance to survive and mature.

Shelter your deciduous shrubs. Cold weather is very hard on these tender shrubs, and potted shrubs should be shielded and protected. Tie together the tops, and then use a sheet or blanket to cover the wigwam loosely. This method is superior to covering plants in plastic, because air can freely circulate, which prevents rotting.

As you now know, organic gardening isn’t as simple as you may have thought. While it takes quite a bit of effort and lots of patience, your pay off in the end will be a fantastic organic garden. If you use the advice above, you can improve your skills at organic gardening.

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